AP English Literature and Composition Goals and Objectives
(link to cohenhandouts wiki)

November 21-22
  • How does text change when it is performed?
ACTIVITY:
  1. Perform your scene


November 18
  • How does text change when it is performed?
  • Students will complete a formulative evaluation of their class job performance.
  • Students will use class time efficiently in order to complete a task.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Rehearse scenes with your partner(s)
  2. Complete job self-evaluation

November 14-15-16-17
  • How does text change when it is performed?
  • Students will draw from outside sources to inspire their performance.
  • Students will use class time efficiently in order to complete a task.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Rehearse scenes with your partner(s)
  2. Read packet "Shakespeare's King Lear: An Address to the Actors"

November 7-8-9-10
  • Students will analyze dramatic elements of plot, character, and language for meaning.
  • Students will demonstrate basic comprehension of the text.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Read/watch Acts 3-4-5
  2. Answer questions in packet: King Lear "Check for Understanding" Questions from Norton Shakespeare


November 4
  • Students will analyze dramatic elements of plot, character, and language for meaning.
  • Students will track concordance of words in King Lear.
  • Students will demonstrate basic comprehension of the text.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Read/watch Act 3
  2. Open-note quiz Acts 1-2
  3. Answer questions in packet: King Lear "Check for Understanding" Questions from Norton Shakespeare

November 2-3
  • What are the most important events in King Lear?
  • Why map the plot structure of a play? What is the dramatic structure of King Lear?
  • Students will analyze dramatic elements of plot, character, and language for meaning.
  • Students will track concordance of words in King Lear.
  • Students will demonstrate basic comprehension of the text.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Read/watch Act 3
  2. Worksheet The Dramatic Structure of King Lear in packet
  3. Answer questions in packet: King Lear "Check for Understanding" Questions from Norton Shakespeare

October 28-31
November 1

  • Students will analyze dramatic elements of plot, character, and language for meaning.
  • Students will track concordance of words in King Lear.
  • What does good commentary look like?
  • How can you conclude how elements of text create meaning?
  • Students will practice basic text comprehension skills.
  • Learning Goals:
    • Reading text: students will practice making careful observations of textual detail, establishing connections among their observations, and drawing from those connections a series of inferences leading to an interpretive conclusion about the meaning and value of a piece of writing
    • Quality of writing: students will employ a wide-ranging vocabulary used with denotative accuracy and connotative resourcefulness; a variety of sentence structures, including appropriate use of subordinate and coordinate constructions; a logical organization, enhanced by specific techniques of coherence such as repetition, transitions and emphasis; and a balance of generalization with specific illustrative detail
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Analysis for Act I of King Lear: Using clear arguments, support for those arguments, and commentary on the impact or significance of chosen examples, answer one of four questions in the packet.
  2. Homework: Choose one scene from Act 1 or 2. Visualize it in animation, comic, illustrations, collage, or some other appropriate visual medium.
  3. Act 2 comprehension questions


October 24-25-26-27
  • Students will analyze dramatic elements of plot, character, and language for meaning.
  • Students will track concordance of words in King Lear.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Read Act I of King Lear as a class. Consider various elements present in the text-What misunderstandings occur? How is the use of double identities important? What patterns occur? etc.
  2. Sign up to track word concordance. Make a chart noting where in the text they occur using MLA citation.

October 17-18-19-20
  • Students will write explanations and find proof for text analysis questions.
  • Students will draw conclusions on the meaning of poems.
  • Students will consider how multiple-choice questions show poem analysis.
  • Students will consider how multiple-choice questions could be used to write an analysis essay.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Work on finding textual support for the correct multiple choice answers for the assigned poems. Argue the answer using this support.


October 4-5-6-7
  • Students will synthesize important information from the poetry unit into an effective review guide, emphasizing some concepts more than others.
ACTIVITY:
  1. Create a poetry unit review guide as a class and post it on the wiki

October 3
  • Students will answer questions using textual support.
  • Students will understand how the utilization of different themes, tones, grammar, form, and imagery create transitions in poetry.
ACTIVITY:
  1. Answer questions about Kubla Khan by Samuel Taylor Coleridge


September 30
  1. Students will write formally on the interpretation of poetry.
  2. Students will draw conclusions on the meaning of poems.
  3. Students will determine whether focus on devices or themes will more effectively determine overall meaning.
ACTIVITY:
  1. AP practice essay 2005 Form B


September 28
  • Students will continue to perform individual jobs in order to better the entire class.
ACTIVITY:
  1. Do something physical and assessable for your job


September 27
  • Students will apply poetic devices to create a specific effect.
  • Students will apply the process of analysis in order to evaluate a work.
  • Students will consider how things learned in school are relevant to their own life and if "classics" are still relevant based in deeper level interpretation.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Share poems/peer discussion
  2. Analyze and discuss A Study of Reading Habits by Philip Larkin as a class


September 26
  • Students will consider the significance of specific devices in Frost's Mending Wall
  • Students will use three of the same poetic devices as Frost to create a poem of their own in order to create an analogous effect in their own writing
ACTIVITY:
  1. Write a 14-line poem using 3 of Frost's devices

September 23
  • Students will consider the elements of symmetry in Frost's Mending Wall and their significance
.

September 22
  • Students will take time to understand a work's complexity and absorb its richness in meaning.
  • Students will practice annotation and freewriting in order to better understand the "experience" level of literature.
ACTIVITY:
  1. 10 minute quick write response to Art by Emerson- "Beauty must come back to the useful arts, and the distinction between the fine and useful arts forgotten."


September 20
  • What constitutes a "good" analysis?
  • Students will understand the full meaning of analysis
  • Students will evaluate self and others through a scaled rubric.
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Analyze Frost's The Mending Wall and complete worksheet Frost's Form and Content: "Mending Wall"
  2. Create rubrics for all three Frost poem analyses
  3. Create rubric for worksheet The Narrative Poetry of Robert Frost

September 19
  • Students will read and internalize poems by famous poets (Robert Frost)
  • Students will look at and take apart different forms of poetry (narrative)
  • Students will gather evidence for arguments from poetry
  • Students will effectively collaborate for group work
or
  • Students will work alone and utilize their time in a meaningful and effective manner
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Analyze Frost's Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening and complete worksheet The Narrative Poetry of Robert Frost
  2. Analyze another Frost poem of your choice

September 16
  • Students will practice "scansion"
  • Students will create a condensed analysis of poetry
ACTIVITY:
  1. Scansion of Because I could not stop for Deathby Emily Dickinson and three sentence analysis:
    1. title and poet and literal main idea
    2. most important devices and their effects
    3. purpose
  2. OPTIONAL EXTRA CREDIT: same assignment for The Lady of Shalott by Lord Alfred Tennyson

September 14-15
  • Students will understand meter and how, when, and why it is used
  • Students will practice "scansion"
ACTIVITIES :
  • Scansion of Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe
  • Other meter examples and scansion practice

September 13
  • Students will paraphrase poetry in order to understand a poem at the simplest experience level
ACTIVITY:
  1. Paraphrase Mowing by Robert Frost

September 12
  • Students will learn to defend, challenge, or qualify an argument made in a poem
ACTIVITY:
  1. Journal response to September 1,1939 by W.H. Auden or Sailing to Byzantium by William Butler Yeats

September 9
  • Students will choose and practice a particular method of analysis
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Analyze A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes and How To Begin by Horace

September 7-8
  • Students will analyze AP mc questions and learn to find evidence to defend every answer
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Return previous AP mc test and discuss as a class
  2. Group AP mc practice test

September 6
  • Students will analyze Crossing the Swamp as a class and understand how the author uses _ to convey _
  • Students will choose the one best example of the most effective techniques, explain why they are important, and explain what they do
  • Students will learn to recognize figurative language
ACTIVITY:
  1. Class analysis/discussion: Crossing the Swamp
  2. Figurative language hunt in A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes


September 2
  • Students will practice for the essay portion of the AP exam
ACTIVITY:
  1. 2004 Form B essay: Crossing the Swamp

August 31
  • Students will practice for the multiple-choice section of the AP exam
  • Students will read questions carefully and be able to use evidence from the poem to select their answer
ACTIVITY:
  1. AP multiple choice practice test

August 29-30
  • Students will practice the steps of analysis
ACTIVITY:
  1. The Red Wheelbarrow analysis using William Carlos Williams packet

August 25-26
  • Students will follow and enrich the experience level of poetry by watching videos
  • Students will demonstrate their understanding of analyzing poetry through a multimedia project
    • experience: visuals, audio, pacing, tone
    • interpret: less explicit, more interpretive
    • evaluate: sell the poem; why should it be read/studied?
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Watch The Daffodils
  2. Queen Anne's Lace multimedia projects


August 23-24
  • Students will use the AP English Literature and Composition course outline in order to formulate objectives for the class as a class by:
    • annotating and pulling out key points
    • outlining objectives as a class
    • working in groups to create easily displayed visual representations
  • Students will perform individual class jobs in order to benefit the class as a whole
ACTIVITIES:
  1. Course Objectives visuals in groups
  2. Receive/understand class jobs